Trapped

Room review: Trapped: The Purge

This room was attempted in collaboration with Escapist X from Singapore Escape Room Reviews.

Their description: It’s Purge Night, and your group is being held captive by a demented torturer…with only 60 minutes before the start of The Annual Purge


As with Trapped’s other rooms, The Purge is advertised as a horror room but isn’t particularly scary, so it’s perfectly playable by cowards such as myself.

There isn’t much immersion, whether in setting or in narrative, but the room manages not to be boring. An early puzzle is tough for arguably the wrong reasons (so do consider asking for help); in contrast, a later puzzle is pleasingly layered, though context-free.

There’s one room aspect that you might either find clever (as I did) or somewhat unfair — either way, it’s a good example of how Trapped’s rooms reward exploration in a way that few other rooms do.

Nothing spectacular, but not a room you need to avoid — in other words, it’s WORTH A TRY if you keep your expectations in check. Though you might want to prioritise Trapped’s other two rooms, which are somewhat more interesting.

Puzzle difficulty: 2/5
Puzzle logic: 3.5/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 1/5

Atmosphere and setting: 2/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 2.5/5
Storyline integration: 1.5/5

Their suggested number of players: 8
My suggested number of players: 2 to 3. You really don’t need more.

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Room review: Trapped: The Mental Ward

Their description: It is your first day as an intern in the Mental Hospital. During your lunch break, you and your colleagues decide to explore the codorned ward. Rumour has it, the most notorious mental patients were in that ward before it was shut down. You have an hour to find out if the rumours you heard about the ward are true, before you have to report back to your superior.


The Mental Ward provides a more comprehensive experience than the room it replaced, and is probably Trapped’s hardest and most engaging room.

First, the usual reassurance: despite the advertising, this is not a scary room — creepy, at most — so it’s perfectly playable even if you’re a coward like me.

The room starts off without much plot, but with some clever use of the space and of technology (for puzzle-solving, not special effects). As you advance, the puzzles remain largely context-free, but the narrative surfaces and there’s an attempt at strengthening the theme. I found one stretch interesting as it had a nice (albeit only initial) sense of world-exploration rather than puzzle-solving.

There’s a risk of technical malfunction midway through, so don’t be afraid to call for help if you think you should be getting something that you’re not. The finale, while underwhelming, is at least somewhat novel.

My reviews for Trapped rooms sound lukewarm even though I generally enjoy them; I suppose they lack stand-out moments that would lead me to recommend them. Nonetheless, when I say The Mental Ward is WORTH A TRY, I don’t mean that in a bad way.

Puzzle difficulty: 3/5
Puzzle logic: 4/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 3.5/5

Atmosphere and setting: 2.5/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 2.5/5
Storyline integration: 2/5

Their suggested number of players: 8
My suggested number of players: 2 to 4

Overall review: Trapped

A confession: I avoided Trapped’s rooms for a long time, partly because their previous rooms were reportedly lacklustre and partly because I’m not a fan of horror. As it turns out, I should have given them a chance earlier.

With a ground-floor location along the exterior of teen mall *Scape, Trapped seems particularly well-placed to receive walk-in customers. Unfortunately, I think the company does itself a disservice by playing up the horror element of its rooms. Creepy props fill the shop window, and their website’s room descriptions suggest that players will have a terrifying time. All of this could dissuade first-time escape room players, or those who (like me) dislike horror.

And that’s a shame, because Trapped’s rooms are beginner-friendly, suitable for small groups, and not actually that scary. Most of their puzzles are logical, fair, and relatively simple. The rooms contain some familiar tropes, providing a good introduction to the escape room genre.

While veterans may breeze through the rooms, they won’t necessarily be bored — there’s at least one particularly satisfying puzzle in each room, and the rooms do repay exploration. It does also appear as though soloing a room might be possible…

Trapped is very much WORTH A VISIT for beginners, or two-player teams who want manageable rooms. Experienced teams are unlikely to feel challenged. But if you’re an experienced player who is running out of rooms to play yet doesn’t want to end up playing bad rooms (like me), rest assured that Trapped’s rooms are worth checking out — even if your visit could be brief.

Staff: Friendly and helpful. They are careful not to reveal too much when you ask for a hint.

Hints: Three hints via intercom phone.

Will your group be combined with strangers? Yes.

Rooms tried: 3 out of 3 current rooms; 1 former room

Recommended team size: 2 to 3 people



Specific room reviews

Current rooms
Escape from Pulau Tekong
The Purge
The Mental Ward

Former rooms
World War 3 (Zombie Edition)


Trapped SG
http://www.trapped.sg/

Room review: Trapped: World War 3 (Zombie Edition)

Their description: The World is at war with the Zombies. As you and your friends seek shelter in an abandoned building, you realized that you are not alone. You have 60mins to solve the mysteries and escape within 60mins before you too join the ranks of the undead.


As with Trapped’s Escape from Pulau Tekong room, World War 3 is nowhere near as scary as the website might have you believe. It’s adequately lit and contains no jump scares; you’ll only really be scared by your own apprehension.

The puzzles are fair and logical. Most are on the easy side, but there are some clever touches and one particular late-stage puzzle that I liked.

The room is WORTH A TRY for beginners. Experienced players who don’t mind a quick game (I attempted this room with one other player and we got out in about 20 minutes) can check it out too — the game may be brief but it’s still fairly satisfying.

Puzzle difficulty: 1.5/5
Puzzle logic: 4/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 1.5/5

Atmosphere and setting: 2.5/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 3/5
Storyline integration: 1/5

Their suggested number of players: 7
My suggested number of players: 2 to 3

Room review: Trapped: Escape from Pulau Tekong

Their description: You have been sent by your commanding chief to Pulau Tekong to find out why the commanding officer there has not been responding to HQ. Upon reaching the island, you find something odd that the entire island is quiet and creepy. You managed to get to the C.O’s bunk and from there your wildest imaginations started to come alive!


Escape from Pulau Tekong was surprising on several levels, for me: it was surprisingly not scary (which I consider a plus); contained some fun or clever in-game surprises; and was just surprisingly good overall (given that I hadn’t heard much praise for Trapped before).

The room is completely playable even if you’re a coward like me, with adequate lighting and no jump scares. There’s a haphazard but decent attempt at setting the scene, and exploration of the room is well rewarded.

The puzzles are generally straightforward but not too trivial. For me, the room’s highlight was (the bulk of) its central midstage puzzle: logical without being tedious, and conveyed in a manner that fit seamlessly into the story and setting. There’s also a solid narrative pay-off that ends the room on a good note.

For me, the strength of that midstage puzzle alone is enough to make the room WORTH A TRY for both beginners and veterans — and the rest of the room certainly isn’t bad either. The room is not physically taxing, but you will need at least one player without mobility issues.

Puzzle difficulty: 2.5/5
Puzzle logic: 4/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 2.5/5

Atmosphere and setting: 3/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 3.5/5
Storyline integration: 3.5/5

Their suggested number of players: 7
My suggested number of players: 2 to 3