Freeing SG

Room review: Freeing SG: Back to the Future

This room was attempted in collaboration with Escapist X from Singapore Escape Room Reviews.
Check out his review of the room too!


Their description: After Benson’s grandpa passed away, his father has been obssessed with finding out the truth about his birth. Benson’s father left a letter saying he found something leading to the truth and left home.

It’s been more than 2 months since he went missing. Benson gathered his group of friends who are geniuses in their own field to assist him.

His dad mentioned that FreeingSG has a way to help him peep into the past…


Back to the Future is a fascinatingly atypical Freeing room. It plays to the company’s main strength of creating a sense of fun and adventure, but is also unusually (for Freeing) challenging and features a much deeper engagement with the narrative than usual.

The room leans satisfyingly into its story, with a strong sense of setting and a clear thread running through the puzzles. To say too much would be to spoil the room’s surprises — and there are quite a few — but suffice it to say that Back to the Future provides a comprehensive, well-rounded experience. There are puzzles which are clever, rigorous, and/or original. There are non-trivial hands-on tasks. Perhaps most satisfyingly, the room rewards exploration — not least in its thrilling endgame, which allowed me to experience a real sense of wonder.

That’s not to say that the room is perfect — one early puzzle suffers from questionable flavourtext, and another midstage puzzle is great in concept but falters in execution. Yet these flaws don’t compromise the overall experience.

The room is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you’re stuck at an early stage — it’s really worth getting to the excellent finale. Sadly, this adventure is not suitable for players with mobility issues.

Puzzle difficulty: 3.5/5
Puzzle logic: 3.5/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 2/5

Atmosphere and setting: 4/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 4/5
Storyline integration: 3.5/5

Their suggested number of players: 6
My suggested number of players: 3 to 5

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Room review: Freeing SG: Jurassic

Their description: A power outage has occurred in the Jurassic Research Facility! As a researcher in the facility, it is your duty to protect a unique dinosaur egg which originated from a rarely seen mutated species. This egg has enormous research value and may hold the genetic code to cure cancer.

Dinosaurs in the facility have breached the perimeter of their captivity, find the unique dinosaur egg and escape before you become a prey!


Even by Freeing’s standards, Jurassic is a very brief room. There aren’t many puzzles, and only one of them posed a challenge (for the wrong reasons).

To the room’s credit, quite some effort was put into creating an industrial lab feel, and various technological tricks and flourishes help to spice up the generally logical puzzles. The game also has a dramatic climax which I found both original and amusing.

Jurassic is WORTH A TRY for beginners, especially if they slow down and enjoy the setting. Experienced teams may be disappointed, and this room is NOT RECOMMENDED for experienced teams who want at least half-an-hour’s worth of fun. (Our team of three escaped in about 15 minutes.)

Puzzle difficulty: 1/5
Puzzle logic: 4/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 2/5

Atmosphere and setting: 3.5/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 3.5/5
Storyline integration: 2/5

Their suggested number of players: 6
My suggested number of players: 2

Room review: Freeing SG: Twilight

Their description: A girl from your tribe has been kidnapped by an immortal being. Werewolves attempt to save her but failed miserably due to an unexpected lunar eclipse during the battle with the immortal. You, one of the werewolves, are chained up in the immortal’s courtyard. How would you escape? Nightfall is approaching. You’ll need to call on the moon by howling to gain back your immense strength.


For a relatively brief room, Twilight ticks quite a few escape room boxes, for better or worse. There’s the start-of-room handcuffs, the thematic first task, some hands-on stuff and trigger mechanisms, a dash of logic, an (unfortunately easily ignored) attempt at narrative, and some surprises along the way.

Unfortunately, its ‘main’ puzzle (or what seemed like the main puzzle to me, anyway) is somewhat unsatisfying, despite some twists which I appreciate in theory. And because this room is so brief, experienced teams might be underwhelmed.

I’d say it’s WORTH A TRY for beginners or those who (like me) just want to play more rooms — just adjust your expectations.

This room is not for players with mobility issues.

Puzzle difficulty: 2/5
Puzzle logic: 3/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 2/5

Atmosphere and setting: 3/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 3/5
Storyline integration: 3/5

Their suggested number of players: 6
My suggested number of players: 2 to 4

Room review: Freeing SG: White House

Their description: As a top notched [sic] agent, you’re tasked to infiltrate The White House to retrieve confidential documents and nuclear activation code. Your organization has provided you with a tablet for communication, but the signal seems to be jammed. You’ll have to get out in 60 minutes before the mission is compromised.

Will you be able to complete the Mission?


The most interesting aspect of White House is probably the use of a tablet as a central device for progressing through the room. Some other rooms have made good — arguably even better — use of digital devices, but not in the same sustained manner. In the White House, the tablet provides and justifies a linear structure, strengthens the theme and narrative, and simply provides an alternative to regular locks.

White House also has the fun technological flourishes you can expect from a Freeing room, and a finale that’s very cool and narratively strong… in theory. As it happened, my team ended up skipping it by mistake, which was a shame. (But it’s also a shame that the room’s construction allows that to happen.)

That’s the good stuff. Unfortunately, White House gets off to a shaky start, with an early puzzle that’s cool in theory but frustrating in practice. The puzzles do get smoother, but some questionable phrasing (and unintentional red herrings) midway through might hamper your progress.

Still, I do consider the room WORTH A TRY — just don’t be afraid to ask for help in the early stages if you’re stuck, and keep moving towards the latter half of the game, where the payoff is better.

Puzzle difficulty: 3.5/5
Puzzle logic: 3/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 3/5

Atmosphere and setting: 2.5/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 3/5
Storyline integration: 3.5/5

Their suggested number of players: 6
My suggested number of players: 2 to 4

Room review: Freeing SG: Poseidon

Their description: The gods are furious with mermaid princess Ariel’s relationship with the prince. Her father Poseidon, God of the Sea, refused to give them his blessings and sealed the Pearl of the Seas in his palace. Legend has it that this magical Pearl will allow mermaids to live on Land.

Touched by their true love, you decided to sneak into Poseidon’s palace and steal the Pearl of the Seas for Ariel…


So it turns out that the U Escape unit at Plaza Singapura was bought over by Freeing SG a while ago, and all their rooms have been replaced. Good news for us — better an untested Freeing room than a U Escape room which you can rely upon to be tedious.

I’ve only tried one room at the new outlet so far, but it seems to be classic Freeing: lots of physical/electronic frills, a smallish number of generally-okay-but-sometimes-a-bit-dubious puzzles.

Credit where it’s due: this room has the most distinctive and surprising beginning of any room I’ve played (though some might find it questionable). The use of technology is generally storyline-motivated, particularly at one fun moment in the endgame stretch. And there are some dramatic things in store.

Weak points include some red herrings and a slightly rough-around-the-edges feel to the set. Sadly, this room is completely unplayable if you have mobility issues.

Nothing groundbreaking puzzle-wise, but WORTH A TRY if you care about fun frills; maybe even RECOMMENDED if you really enjoy novelty and dramatic elements.

Puzzle difficulty: 2.5/5
Puzzle logic: 3.5/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 3/5

Atmosphere and setting: 3/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 4/5
Storyline integration: 3/5

Their suggested number of players: 6
My suggested number of players: 2 to 4

Room review: Freeing SG: Rise to the Challenge: Biohazard

This was a pop-up escape room that was only around for about a week (19 to 27 Jan 2017), which is why I’m not posting the actual review here. But it was a great and groundbreaking (for Singapore) room, and I’d love to see more like it.

You can find the review over on my escape event blog, escaped.sg, instead:
Freeing SG – Rise to the Challenge: Biohazard

Room review: Freeing SG: Funeral: The Mourning Widow

Their description: In one’s lifetime, a visit to the funeral palour is inevitable. One day, you receive a letter from your friend’s wife, informing you of your friend’s death. Successively, mutual friends receive similar letters. Tonight is the setting up of the wake. Following the address stated in the letter, you make your way to attend the wake. As you enter the mourning hall, you feel a strange sense of discomfort. You decide to call your friend’s wife but there is no response. With no alternative, you make your way in alone, wanting to pay your last respects to your dear friend. The room where your deceased friend’s body lie, it is locked! What is going on??


The selling point of this Freeing SG room is its unprecedented (in Singapore) use of VR technology — but that also makes this a hard room to assess.

So let’s set aside the VR component for now. The room isn’t bad. The atmosphere is appropriately creepy and the setting evokes a traditional Chinese funeral convincingly. It’s not cripplingly terrifying, so even cowards like myself can give it a fair shot. There are some cool mechanisms used, and the initial flow of the room is very much in line with the storyline.

On the puzzle side of things, the room does sag a bit. The puzzles are generally logical, but the wording of clues isn’t perfect, there’s one throwaway puzzle (so throwaway that it’s easy to dismiss the solution as surely not being correct), and none of the puzzles are that exciting as puzzles (although the mechanisms compensate for this).

But for me, at least, none of that was really the point. I wanted to play this room to see how the VR headset would be used — and I think it was used to good effect. The actual puzzle it facilitated wasn’t impressive, but the execution was pretty cool; it’s hard to explain further without getting spoilery.

One big problem, though, was that my team experienced some technical difficulties. Which is a shame, because if the VR headset had worked perfectly, I think we’d have had a more satisfying experience in the room and come away with a better impression of it. As it was, I’m personally willing to overlook a lot of flaws if a room is ambitious and different — but my teammates were much less forgiving.

If you’re interested in seeing how VR can be used in escape rooms, then this room is definitely worth playing purely for the experience. Is it a fun room in its own right? It can be, particularly if the technology is working. On the whole I’d say it’s WORTH A TRY — unless you really can’t bear any technical malfunction or are completely uninterested in the VR aspect, in which case this is NOT RECOMMENDED for you.

Do note that a knowledge of Chinese is basically required for one puzzle and very helpful (though not technically necessary) for another one.

Puzzle difficulty: 3/5
Puzzle logic: 3.5/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 3.5/5

Atmosphere and setting: 4/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 4.5/5
Storyline integration: 2/5

Their suggested number of players: 6
My suggested number of players: 3 to 4

Room review: Freeing SG: Alice in Wonderland

Their description: While taking a stroll in the woods, you discovered a book on the ground and realised it was “Alice in Wonderland”. As you picked it up, a smartly-dressed rabbit flashed past you and darted into a rabbit hole. Out of curiosity, you approached the rabbit hole. As you leaned forward, a mysterious force pulled you in and you lost consciousness. When you woke up, you found yourself in an unknown place. What has happened?!


This was the first new Freeing room I’d played after a long while, and I was pleasantly surprised. Freeing’s tech-based strengths are still there, the atmosphere is well done, and the puzzles are reliably logical, making for a good experience overall.

Unlike some other companies, Freeing’s use of tech has always been purposeful rather than gratuitous. This room is no exception: technology is used for puzzle- and story-relevant purposes, and to achieve some fun effects. That’s just as well, as these flourishes make up for the absence of some other surprises that you might have expected.

The framing device of the storyline enlivens one room aspect that could otherwise be boring. It also props up the logic of various puzzles, which include some fun hands-on aspects.

Just two warnings:
– The text means it’s possible to be thrown off by how to start (as happened to us), so watch out for that.
– There’s a point at which one puzzle answer is meant to unlock two things, but could end up unlocking only one, due to technological sensitivity.

If you manage to avoid both the above issues, then your Alice in Wonderland adventure should go well. RECOMMENDED as a fun, multi-faceted experience.

Freeing’s other rooms have tended to deteriorate over time, but the Alice in Wonderland room was still in good repair, possibly because it’s quite new. (There was already one technical aspect of the room that was broken when we played and caused some trouble for us, but we alerted the staff after the game and it’s easy to fix, so hopefully that won’t be an issue anymore.) It might be worth playing this room ASAP, just to ensure you get as good an experience as possible.

Puzzle difficulty: 2.5/5
Puzzle logic: 4/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 3/5

Atmosphere and setting: 3.5/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 4/5
Storyline integration: 4/5

Their suggested number of players: 6
My suggested number of players: 3 or 4. Possible but logistically tough (at one point, anyway) with 2 players.

Room review: Freeing SG: War: The Battle for Freedom

Their description: You are a member of the Special Operations Unit, and are now onboard an army carrier from which you’ll be parachuting out of to an area outside of enemy surveillance. Your mission, is to retrieve highly sensitive information of our enemy’s tactical response headquarters and send the data back to base using the signal set. This mission is critical and will give us the upper hand in crushing our enemy. You must succeed!

Players take on the roles of four types of soldiers, each holding on to an important tool, all of them, crucial for the mission. Only when you have switched on the power supply, will you be able to activate important clues. You must decipher the codes fast and obtain the confidential information before your enemy sees you!

Soldiers, move out!


I completely forgot that I hadn’t written this room review yet, which should tell you something about what I thought about the room. Perhaps in earlier, happier days, War: The Battle for Freedom indeed lived up to its promise that players would take on the roles of four types of soldiers. Perhaps the equipment in the room was once actually used to send signals — a war-themed room is excellent for multimedia puzzles such as Morse code, after all.

But no. When we attempted the War room in June, it was a lacklustre experience. We didn’t notice any particular roles we had to play. The puzzles ranged from passable to literally non-existent: one box opened up simply to reveal the code for another box. Even Freeing SG’s usual multimedia flair seemed absent, except for the very last task (which wasn’t even as impressive as it could have been). This seemed particularly strange as, again, a war-themed room opens up all sorts of possibilities for special effects or background noises to create atmosphere.

The physical setting is at least appropriately grimy and war-zone-esque, though the lighting is also frustratingly dim. On the whole, unfortunately, this was not a room worth fighting for. NOT RECOMMENDED.

Puzzle difficulty: 2/5
Puzzle logic: 2.5/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 2/5

Atmosphere and setting: 3/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 2.5/5
Storyline integration: 3.5/5

Their suggested number of players: Up to 8
My suggested number of players: 3 to 4

Room review: Freeing SG: Spaceship: Galactic Survival

Their description: Year 2325 A.D., humans have lived on Planet T908 for more than a century. Living in this unpredictable galaxy, the planet that everyone has depended on is now facing a serious meteorite shower attack. Survival of our kind is at stake. We must escape and seek refuge on another planet, if not, humans shall no longer exists.

You and your friends are rushing against time in search of a functional space shuttle. You found an abandoned shuttle. There is no more time, you have to get it in the air and escape this doomed planet!


Spaceship: Galactic Survival is just a really fun, immersive experience. We were impressed the moment we stepped into the room, which has been faithfully done up to look like the control room of a spaceship: captain’s chair, video screens, locked escape capsule door, the works.

It’s not just cosmetic, either. You’ll have to power-up the spaceship, pay attention to video screens, and do other fun hands-on things in order to escape. (At the start, the immersion is taken so far that some teams might be impatient. Relax and watch your craft hurtle through space. It takes a while, but you have adequate time to escape.)

The puzzles themselves are not too complex, but they are largely logical, manage to avoid that old escape room staple of mere matching, and are conveyed in a wide range of multimedia forms.

The endgame is also a nice narrative touch. My only complaint would be that a staff member entered the room to tell us how to proceed; this could have been included in the initial briefing instead, so as not to break immersion.

Don’t try Spaceship: Galactic Survival if you only care about puzzle complexity. But if you’re willing to have some fun, this room is definitely RECOMMENDED.

Puzzle difficulty: 2.5/5
Puzzle logic: 3.5/5
Multimedia aspect of puzzles: 5/5

Atmosphere and setting: 5/5
Exciting flourishes, use of technology or physical aspects: 4.5/5
Storyline integration: 4.5/5

Their suggested number of players: Up to 8
My suggested number of players: 3 to 5